Showing posts with label hypodontia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hypodontia. Show all posts

Wednesday, 1 February 2017

Hypodontia Study Day 2017



The Kings Hypodontia study day is being held on the 19th of April at Kings College Hospital. This course is aimed at trainees and specialty grades but is likely to provide some useful information to consultants involved in the management of the condition that may be looking at updating the evidence base for decision making. 

Important issues such as definitions and aetiology and the need for joint planning will be presented followed by management of the mixed dentition and orthodontic considerations. Towards the end of the day techniques in adhesive dentistry such as the utilisation of composite and resin bonded bridges will be described. The last presentation will review the need for implants and considerations when providing these. 

Information on registering and attendance will be provided on the below link. 

Thursday, 1 September 2016

Is there a link between ovarian cancer and hypodontia ?

A systematic review by Iavazzo and colleagues revealed a possible link between ovarian cancer and hypodontia although the research associated with this was very weak at best.

In total, 385 patients were included in this study. Control group was present in 3 out of 4 studies (340 patients). Hypodontia was present in 20%. Only in 2 out of 4 studies, the number of missing teeth was mentioned (47 teeth), while the majority of them were either maxillary second premolars or maxillary lateral incisors. 

Unilateral distribution of the missing teeth was present in 28 out of 46 patients, while bilateral distribution of the missing teeth was present in 18 out of 46 patients. The presence of ovarian cancer in the family medical history occurred in 12 out of 33 patients. Only 1 out of 4 studies examined the presence of genes with mutations in the included patients. Based on these findings, the lack of clinical studies was the principal obstacle to clarify the possible predictive value of hypodontia in the early prediction of patients with higher risk of ovarian cancer.

Tuesday, 26 July 2016

New evidence shows patients prefer closing spaces versus opening spaces when teeth are missing




Qadri and colleagues have surveyed lay members of the public to try and measure their perception of different types of orthodontic treatment and subsequent restorative treatment. Opening of lateral incisor spaces can be difficult to get right especially if there are other complicating factors. The closure of spaces obviously has its advantages. It removes the need for ongoing maintenance of a restoration such as a resin bonded bridge, this can be even more complicated and involved where implant restorations are planned in these sites which will potentially need grafting and long life maintenance...lets not mention the potential for complications ! 

Other issues to consider with space closure include the gingival profile of the canine, the depth of colour of the canine and its size and ability to be disguised with bleaching and bonding as a lateral incisor. In this research from a group in Sheffield (UK) they found that patients and laypeople preferred space closure from an aesthetic sense as opposed to having a restoration in the lateral incisor position.    


LINK TO ABSTRACT

Friday, 8 January 2016

Certain genes are related to certain patterns of missing teeth

I could never profess to knowing anything about genetics in any great detail ! In this graphic the two main genes in Hypodontia are illustrated. MSX1 shows a significantly different pattern of tooth loss to PAX9 which is heavily associated with the commonly missing lateral incisors and premolars. Have a read of the below article for more information.  





Thursday, 24 December 2015

Is there a link between hypodontia and ovarian cancer ?



There is emerging evidence that Hypodontia is a risk marker for Ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer ranks as the 8th commonest cancer in women and only 30% of patients survive as such it is the 5th leading cause of cancer amongst women. In a recent study 20% of ovarian cancer patients had signs of hypodontia. Please click on the link below which will take you to Anna Yu's presentation from the University of Kentucky.  

Click here for a presentation exploring the link.

Saturday, 24 October 2015

Is hypodontia a wholly genetic condition ?

An article in the British Dental Journal from 2007 reviews current knowledge on the aetiological basis for hypodontia as well as various types of presentation and classification. Syndromes that are associated with congenitally missing teeth are also illustrated in a table. Click on the link below for the full article. 

Hypodontia-Is it all in the genes ?

Monday, 21 September 2015

Hypodontia is ideally treated in a multidisciplinary setting- A case report

The purpose of this article is to describe a team approach to treatment of hypodontia in adolescent dentition. A case report of hypodontia with a microdontic lateral incisor in a Class I malocclusion illustrates the principles of case management. Multidisciplinary consultation during treatment planning and coordination and appropriate timing of subsequent interdisciplinary dental care enables the clinician to provide the optimum care. The scope of orthodontic and restorative management depends on the severity of the hypodontia.

Tuesday, 15 September 2015

Hypodontia can be treated with adhesive techniques efficiently

Dr Samira Al-Salehi of the Dubai College of Dental Medicine has recently presented a case report illustrating the use of adhesive or 'sticky' dentistry to rehabilitate a patient presenting with mild to moderate hypodontia. A pdf of the article can be accessed on the below link.

Sunday, 6 September 2015

Baby teeth can be built up to function like adult teeth

The Leeds restorative dentistry group have published a review illustrating how 'baby' teeth can be efficiently built up with white filling material to function like adult teeth. This procedure doesn't require the need for anaesthesia or tooth drilling and can be delivered easily. 



Wednesday, 2 September 2015

Patients with Hypodontia have different needs to other patients

The hypodontia team from the Eastman Dental Institute have published a review paper outlining the management needs of patients with hypodontia with specific reference to the dental, psycho-social, medical, functional, educational and financial implications that this diagnosis can bring. They identified the need for disease prevention as well as the management issues that can present during growth and development. The article can be accessed on the link below.

Wednesday, 5 August 2015

Thursday, 16 July 2015

Why overcomplicate hypodontia treatment?


A recent research article in the International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research emphasised the importance of non-destructive restorative management of missing teeth. A good aesthetic outcome was achieved with bonded white composite fillings and resin bonded bridges (sticky bridges). After 4 years of fixed orthodontics, a good aesthetic result can be achieve with minimal intervention, non-tooth destructive restorative treatment in a relatively short period of time.

Click on the link below for the full article:

http://pubs.sciepub.com/ijdsr/3/2A/1/

This post was by Lakshmi Rasaratnam, StR in Restorative Dentistry, Kings College Hospital. l.rasaratnam@nhs.net

Monday, 15 June 2015

Hypodontia is a common problem amongst Cleft lip palate patients

A recent dental review from Malaysia  has reminded dental professionals and informed patients that hypodontia is a common problem amongst patients who present with cleft lip and palate. Cleft lip and palate is a group of conditions that includes cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and both together. A cleft lip is an opening in the upper lip that may extend into the nose. The opening may be on one side, both sides, or in the middle. 

These disorders can result in feeding problems, speech problems, hearing problems, and frequent ear infections. Less than half the time the condition is associated with other disorders. One of the most significant problems is that of difficulties in eating due to the opening in the mouth and the routine absence of teeth near the opening. 


Click on the link to be taken to the article.



Sunday, 7 June 2015

Scottish research shows how common hypodontia is !

Recent research from Aberdeen Dental School has shed new light on how common (incidence/prevalence) 
Hypodontia is. Approximately 6.5% of the worlds population has hypodontia but this can vary by continent. Hypodontia was most common in Africa: 13.4%, followed by Europe 7%, Asia 6.3% and Australia 6.3%with a lower prevalence in North America 5.0% CI: 4.1–5.9 and Latin America and Caribbean 4.4%. 

Click on the link below for the published paper. 

Saturday, 23 May 2015

New research shows that resin bridges can last a very very long time without any problems !

New research from Bristol Dental Hospital illustrates that resin bonded bridges can last 15 years or more when delivered under the right circumstances to patients with missing teeth. A survival study was conducted on patients who have had resin bonded bridges and it was shown that patients who did not loose the bridge by 4 years could possibly have the bridge for life such were the excellent nature of the results. 

Click on the link below for the abstract.